IT IS UP TO YOU TO MAKE IT YOUR THEATRE!!

NEVER GIVE UP!!          

 

All the world’s a stage,

          And all the men and women merely players:

          They have their exits and their entrances;

          And one man in his time plays many parts…

                                                          

 

                                  Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7

 

OUR WORLD IS CHANGING ALL THE TIME AS THE ANCIENT GREEKS SAID, " TA PANTA RI"" WHICH MEANS,  EVERYTHING CHANGES. THE NEW WORLD OF INTERNET, SOCIAL MEDIA, PRIVATE ENTERPRISE MAKE THE WORDS OF SHAKESPEARE AS WISE AS THEY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN.

THE BEGINNING OF ANY BUSINESS IN VERY DIFFICULT AND MINE WAS NO EXCEPTION. INVESTING THREE THOUSANDS POUNDS IN 1985 AND THEN BEING UNABLE TO MAKE A PENNY OUT OF IT, RATHER ABOUT A THOUSAND POUNDS EXPENSES WAS THE WORST THING THAT COULD HAPPEN TO ME AFTER 1985 TURNED TO BE VERY PROFITABLE.

THE FRENCH EXPERIMENT FAILED LUCKILY, THE AMERICAN EXPERIMENT HIT ME HARD AND I WAS IN DESPAIR, I MUST ADMIT.  I COULD NOT FATHOM THE EVENTS RELATED TO THE MONTEZIN PAINTING AND WHAT I WAS DOING TO GET RID OF IT, RATHER THAN SELL IT PROPERLY AND WHERE I SHOULD. I LOST PATIENCE AND I WA RUNNING LIKE A HEADLESS CHICKEN ALL OVER THE PLACE, AS IF MY LIFE DEPENDED ON IT. FAR FROM THAT!!

 

Pierre Montezin nearly drowns the amateur

 

 

 

October 1986, Sotheby’s New York

The Pierre Montezin work was included in the first Arcade Sale of Impressionist and Modern paintings of Sotheby’s in New York in October 1986.  This was the first sale of a new experiment; first catalogue, different clientele to the regular Impressionist sales.  I was worried, justifiably worried and very upset. Being in London, I could do nothing about it. I felt cheated and deceived!  Had I known, I would never have consented to selling my property in a new business venture with an unproven sales record. I was angry with myself, as I had not negotiated the right sale for my property.  My only wish was for the painting to sell and sell well; but the best result is usually achieved in the best sale.  That was not the best sale!

It was a complete disaster!  The painting failed to sell at $5,000, but I was happy as I would have been out of pocket had it sold at that reserve. The costs had already piled up.  Shipping the painting to New York, the trip to France, now unsold charges and the painting had cost me close to £4000. It was becoming a noose round my neck threatening to choke me! To add salt to injury some clever person offered, through Sotheby’s, an after-sale bid of $4000, to which I answered,  “If this person has any Montezin paintings similar to mine, I will buy them all at $8,000 each.”  I was furious with the audacity of that person.  I was in a financial squeeze, but I was not stupid. 

Never undersell your property even when everything points south because the compass can change direction quickly and dramatically.

I was very worried but also somehow hopeful! Where did that hope come from since that investment had been all doom and gloom up to that point? 

·        Thinking positively has been a trait of mine all along!  Never lose faith, think positively and hope! 

·        An unsold painting today might be worth double the following day! 

·         Something positive did happen later in October and November when several paintings by Montezin sold for around ten thousand dollars at Sotheby’s and Christie’s.

I kept asking myself, why had my property failed to sell since auction results in New York were much higher than $5000, my reserve?  It was a puzzle.  Was it the sale it was entered in or was there something wrong with the painting?  However, my accumulated auction experience of the last three years led me to believe that it was the new auction format of Sotheby’s that was to blame and not the quality of the painting. Even though fed up now with the adventure called Montezin, there was still hope for the future.  I would have to wait and ride the storm since I had no alternative at the time and had exhausted nearly all other options to sell.

On my next visit to New York in November 1986 I collected the painting and left it in the care of relatives in New Jersey.  I was resigned to live the nightmare for some more time.  Would it be months or years?  How long could or would I have to wait for the Montezin to fulfil the expectations I had when I bought it at Christie’s?  Would I be able to stop the haemorrhage and recover my £4000 investment, if nothing else? 

 

 

 

 

INVESTING IN UNKNOWN ARTISTS IS NOT A WASTE OF TIME AND MONEY!!

MY BLOG IS NOT JUST FOR ART INVESTORS

WHEN I PUT MY FIRST TEN POUNDS IN A PIECE OF ART, I NEVER THOUGHT I WOULD GO INTO ART INVESTMENTS IN LATER YEARS.  I FELT I NEEDED TO DO SOMETHING ELSE TOO, I FELT THERE WAS ANOTHER WAY OF MAKING AN EXTRA PENNY AND SO I STARTED TIMIDLY BUYING WHAT I LIKED WITHOUT KNOWING THE FIRST THING ABOUT ART VALUES, PRICES AND ARTISTS. 

THAT I HOPE WOULD COME IN TIME TIME AS IT DID OVER THE FOLLOWING YEARS AND DECADES.

 

Neglected and forgotten artists deserve a second and third look

 

NEGLECTED IN 1988 BUT ....

VASILIS ZENETZIS  ( 1935-2016)

I started writing this diary with no aim a long time ago.  I guess I was just feeding my own ego! That changed and the reasons why this book is now in your hands is to:

·         Tell the story of an amateur investor who over time became a connoisseur

·         Assist anyone wishing to follow the same path

·         Help any potential investors to invest wisely

·         Inform sellers where and how to sell their valuable art

·         Alert sellers to their rights when selling at auction

Suggesting how to invest, who to invest in and why is not easy and not finite as there are millions of artists worldwide, but only a few thousand that might make the difference to you. Anybody reading these memoirs and thinking along the same lines as I have done over the last thirty years will have the ride of his/her life. I am convinced similar and better results can be achieved. I have arrived where I am today by loving what I have been doing and by working extremely hard. 

If you have a business sense, if you are a hard worker and a small risk- taker, then you have an awesome combination to succeed either in the art business or any other business. Take the opportunities by the horn and believe in yourself.

There is an abundance of artists selling in the low hundreds and even less at auction worldwide. There are those whose work is not rated highly, while there are others whose work is of merit but in disfavour and unwanted at the time they appear at auction.

Alexandra Exter is a shining example of that. Unwanted in the USSR period and neglected, paying $3000 in February 1988 at Sotheby’s New York was a very small sum for the artist and her work. Paying £4500 four months later was still very little for the artist. Selling a Richard Sommer painting at Christie’s South Kensington for £500 in 1986 was a major mistake because similar paintings of the artist sell between twenty and forty thousand pounds today. Was it a good idea to sell a lovely John Bratby for £500 in the late 1980s?

The auction scene offers plenty of opportunities to buy underrated artists who are deceased or alive.  Living artists are the ones where an investor might make a significant sum of money, but they are harder to locate and riskier to invest in. Yes, we cannot all discover a Warhol, Murakami or Hirst, but there are thousands of other artists who offer investment opportunities and those are the ones we recommend you look for.

John Bentham-Dinsdale was trading close to £2000 at best at the turn of the millennium. His marine art was of the highest quality and any price below that was an investment opportunity. AR Penck’s top art was trading in the region of £20,000 in the 1980s.  His important art sells close to £200,000 today.

The opportunities to invest in artists with similar profiles are plenty.  All that’s required is good research, a little knowledge, a little money and love of an artist’s work.  My strong advice is to buy for personal gratification primarily and the markets and time will take care of the rest.

               

                         “ Neglected and forgotten means investment”

 

Unknown artists

My story began for real when I purchased a small watercolour by an artist, Sydney Lawrence, unknown to experts and dealers at Sotheby’s. It was an investment made on aesthetic grounds that paid an art enthusiast handsomely and started my art venture. The diary has recounted many similar cases elsewhere, thus making a strong case for the argument:

                                  “Unknown does not mean worthless”  

Remember the Thon at Philips, the Coulentianos at Roseburys, Lanza at Lots Road?  These are only a small number among the dozens that I can really recount.  There are still plenty of other unknown artists waiting to be discovered.  The reference libraries, the myriad of publications on the Internet are great sources of information, but they only reveal a small part of the whole story. Unless you unite opportunity and available information you will not make that miraculous investment that might change your life.

There are thousands of unknown artists whose work merits more respect and better financial support. The auction arena is a very unforgiving and harsh environment where such work sells for a song, although worth a lot more artistically. If the artist is unknown to you but you like the piece, then buy for art, and value for money is certain to be there too. I paid thirty-two pounds for the Page watercolours at the counter of Christie’s South Kensington. Ingrald –Lund is generally unknown, but the royal content of the painting renders it valuable. What is the difference in the art of Amorsolo and his student Custodio?   The first is a famous, known artist selling over £100,000 at auction and the second one a little known artist selling for just over £1,000.

An unknown artist does not mean a bad artist; on the contrary it might mean a future master and a treasure!

 

Trendy and fashionable artists

There are times and long periods when the work of an artist is exceedingly desirable and much sought after by serious investors as well as one off investors who want to jump on the bandwagon. As a seasoned investor, I have already learned to avoid hot and trendy artists.

Many artists are trendy and fashionable, but not necessarily a good and sound investment for the future. What I advise here cannot be dismissed lightly:

·         When an artist becomes highly fashionable and trendy, the call of the sirens and respectable gurus to invest in his/her art is a loud warning to avoid investing in such art and artist.

·         Investing in an artist whose prices are frothing cannot be the best investment strategy.

Every country has its trendy and fashionable artists. They are extremely desirable and expensive contemporary artists.  They are still alive, producing work in abundance, actually too much art for comfort. Will they be that collectable and a sound investment in twenty-thirty years’ time? That remains to be seen and therefore my advice is to be careful with such investments, as their future value is not guaranteed.

Art history and auction prices talk about artists whose prices saw meteoric rises for one reason or another. Then prices gradually came down to a level that made their work affordable and one where many investors were happy to invest in. What changed?  Trends, fashions and times! Victorian art is not fashionable right now; the Pre-Raphaelites were the trendy art of the late 1980s and early 1990s, but the prices achieved about twenty years ago are not possible any more. A few investors disappeared, prices fell and the crazy prices of those are a distant memory.

It would be unwise to part with a significant sum of money because all of a sudden certain collectors chase the work of an artist. The reasons might be promotional rather than real quality of art and market forces. There is no need to mention names among the top contemporary artists, but beware of the huge bubbles that are ready to explode.  Wise are the investors who bought the art of famous contemporary artists when these artists were relatively unknown!

                   

                     “Leading the pack is much wiser than following the flock!”

 

 

 

MARINE ART AND ITS BLESSINGS!!

INVESTING IN MARINE ART PROVED VERY GOOD!!

 

HENRY SCOTT, INCLUDED IN OUR EXHIBITION OF OCTOBER 2017

THE LESSONS OF THEN DO NOT APPLY TODAY BUT ONE HAS TO LOOK AT THE LONG TERM PICTURE. MARINE PAINTING HAVE BEEN POPULAR ALL ALONG AND NO WAY THEY WILL NOT BE IN THE FUTURE. AS LONG AS THERE IS MARINE LIFE, MARINE PAINTINGS AND ART WILL BE POPULAR!!

WHERE DO I GET THREE THOUSAND POUNDS WITHIN A MONTH??

 

Deal or No Deal?

Lucien Potronat

(French, [1889-    ] Well known for his magnificent views of the Côte D’Azur in Southern France and mostly collected in England. Auction price range £500-3000)

In June of 1987 I bought a beautiful View of the Côte D’Azur by Lucien Potronat at Phillips Marylebone, London for just £125. It was a painting for the house and my own joy and enjoyment.  It spoke about home, it spoke about my life and it was a bargain.  More importantly, it was provenanced by Stacy-Marks, Eastbourne England, at some time in the past, as the label on the reverse of the painting indicated.

I knew that Stacy-Marks were actively buying the artist because I had seen them bidding and buying Potronat works at Lewes in East Sussex. It was no secret! All good traders, should have known that or similar facts about rich galleries.  Could Potronat assist me to raise the funds I needed in a private sale?

Twenty days to go! The pressure to pay the Dawson was on and gradually increasing as the days went by. It was three thousand pounds, a very serious sum of money in 1987.  I had no such sum in the bank as everything had been invested in Penck, Roubaud, Girardet, Montezin, Fassianos and other artists, which were to be sold at auction later in the year.

I loved the Med View of Lucien Potronat and had intended to keep the painting for the family’s enjoyment and for the future. However, when in need of money, you need to sell what is the easiest and the quickest. If you own stocks you sell your stocks, if you own art you sell your art and selling art privately to a gallery was the quickest way for me.

I knew the painting was worth a couple of thousand pounds because smaller size paintings of the artist were selling close to six hundred pounds at auction. Could I sell the Potronat privately to Stacy-Marks? Would they be interested?  How would I make up the missing money even if I sold the painting to that gallery? I would still be short of a few hundred pounds and I had only twenty days to pay Bonhams.

Stacy-Marks was one of those family galleries with old stock and shrewd old shoes running the business. My call to them was short and to the point. On mentioning the name Potronat, they immediately asked to see the painting with a view to buying it, if we came to an agreement.  No promises, but that was an encouraging initial contact. I could not mess up this transaction, as I was desperate for the money.  It was tricky, it was the first time I was selling to a gallery, but there is always a first time. 

I drove to Eastbourne that Saturday with a million thoughts circling in my mind. Would they buy at the right price? Would they throw me out?  What would happen with the Dawson? Would Bonhams cut me out as their client, if I failed to pay in time?  Keep cool, do not panic and do not show anxiety and worry. Play your cards right and everything will be fine, I kept telling myself.  Much harder to do than say!

On entering the impressive gallery in the heart of Eastbourne, a thriving town on the south coast of England, I was struck by the high quality of the art on the walls. I introduced myself and soon enough it was show time.  They liked the painting. They surely did. It was one of theirs. “How much do you want?” inquired the old fox, Stacy-Marks. He was the one calling the shots and there was a bright sparkle in the old man’s eyes. He knew the business much better than his sons and myself. The evidence was there to see.

“I am selling the painting for £2000.  It’s a lovely painting and worth every penny.”  Cool and composed, I made my case. No nerves, no worries and very sure of myself. Where did that come from? This was supposed to be a first time!

“Yes,” the old man responded, “it is worth that much, but we are dealers and we want to make a little bit of money too. I think a fair deal is £1500.”  I rejected the offer as too little in the hope of making a little more. Back and forth, hesitation here and there and the compromise was £1800 on the spot. They were happy with the purchase - I was delighted with it, to say the least.  A cheque of £1800 was handed to me; signed and rubber-stamped.  It was an immense achievement as a first time!

With an £1800 cheque in my pocket, I felt like flying back to London. I was on top of the world!  Four years after I had started dealing in art, I could sell directly to galleries at a good profit.  Do you call a return of 1500% only a good profit!  The trip back to London was like a minute. I was so proud of myself. It was such a satisfying experience and a moneymaking one too.  I was full of beans and convinced that I wouldn’t have a problem paying for the Dawson.  But I was still short of about £1000, still a significant sum. What else could I sell or buy for immediate re-sale? Success whets the appetite and you want more of the same.

Luck was on my side all the way! Thank you!

Fiction is fine, but the art trading events in these memoirs are better than fiction at times.  Here I am recounting these unbelievable events that occurred at the right time and the right moment. How was that possible?  I still wonder and still ask!  Who and what was moving the pieces and making events happen? Luck? Surely something was intervening on my behalf. I was moving my little finger too, but something else was at play and the Ancient Greek saying is appropriate here,

“ Sin Athena kai heira kinei”.  “Move your little finger, if you wish luck to assist you.”

 

Bargain at my doorstep can pay for the Dawson  

Gabriel Deschamps

(French, [1919-   ] Twentieth century artist of French landscapes, well collected and popular at auctions in the UK.  Auction price range £500-3000)

I was back in London that Saturday hoping that something else might happen quickly and the Dawson problem would be solved.  Sunday for me was viewing of various auctions in two or three different places in London. That included North West Auctions in North London where from time to time the odd worthwhile painting appeared in their weekly auctions and nearly always at a bargain price.  On that Sunday in August 1987 I was not expecting anything miraculous after the Saturday miracle at Eastbourne. A second miracle within days was too much to ask.

Nevertheless, Lady Luck was looking after me from above and I was moving around to make things happen. Covering nearly half the display wall of the auction was a huge impressive landscape with a style and colouring that was immediately recognizable to me. On approaching I was spellbound.   There it was, signed to the bottom right G. Deschamps or Gabriel Deschamps. The painting looked magnificent, fresh, clean and straight from a home. That was the possible solution to the problem called Montague Dawson, but could I buy it at that ridiculous estimate?  Would I be going back to Stacy-Marks again the following weekend?  Deschamps was another one of his artists! 

Monday evening and it was auction time.  My hope was to buy the painting for nothing as only experienced traders knew who Deschamps was and Finchley auctions did not attract too many of those. I was sure of that.  I waited patiently and quietly. Cool, cold and calculating, the hunter took aim hiding behind the large items of furniture. I wanted nobody to see me, to smell my presence.  The situation was grave; I wanted the Dawson problem solved that very night.

The loud voice of the auctioneer still echoes in my ears. Loud, crisp and clear.  Why didn’t he become a singer? Great voice for that profession! Deschamps is in view and up for sale.  “Thirty pounds I have,” he shouted out. Easy mister, I need a bargain, do not wake them up.  “Thirty-two, thirty-four, thirty-six, thirty-eight … forty-five I have and I am selling at forty-five,” he boomed.  The hammer came blissfully down and I became the owner of the Deschamps shy of fifty pounds, which included commissions. I can still see his beaming face. However, all the smiles were mine! 

I walked out of the crammed auction to take a breath of fresh air.  I could not digest the event.  I could not believe that such conspiracies of luck happened to normal humans. How could I be so lucky and privileged?  Lady Luck, my protectress, had provided me with another opportunity to raise the remaining sum for the Dawson painting.  Luck had been good to me again, but it was also invaluable knowledge of art that enabled me to seize this opportunity.

Forty-nine pounds and a few pence I paid that very night and off I set with the beautiful Deschamps. What did I buy? The canvas, the paints, the frame or what? It was a ridiculously low price, but hey, that was auctions for you with the great opportunities offered to all.

My second trip to Eastbourne was as successful as the first one - no hassles and no arguments at £1500. I had struck another great deal with the old Stacy-Marks and solved an immense problem hanging over my head. Four trades within a month, under such circumstances, were not only hugely rewarding but also didactic.

·         Sell to gulleries privately even if the profits might be slightly less.

·         Knowledge of the stock of galleries is important.

·         Daredevil investments might cause serious money problems and lead to litigation, if one fails to pay.

·         Luck is an important ally, but knowledge is a battle winner.

 

Specialist theme sales are preferred

Three agonizing weeks it took me to fund the Dawson, but I enjoyed having it up on the wall in the meantime. I loved the subject, the style and colours.  But it was not destined to stay there.  The artist’s work was selling extremely well at auction.  I needed a return on my investment so the Dawson was entered for Sotheby’s Marine sale of May/June 1988.  I considered a specialist sale much better than a general one for several reasons:

·         Serious collectors of that type of art frequent such auctions and prices climb higher, especially if an item is unique.

·        Art unique to a nation in a specialist sale always sells better than in a mixed sale.

I consigned the painting with Sotheby’s in February 1988 with an estimate of £6-8000 and a reserve of £6000, reasonably hoping for a sale close to £10,000.  The reserve guaranteed me a 75% profit.

The Dawson looked great in the catalogue. Unfortunately three similar watercolours by the same artist plus several oil paintings were also included in the same sale.  I did not mind the oils, but the watercolours were an issue. Too many of the same thing in a sale was a disadvantage. Had I known that, I would have delayed the sale.

The watercolour sold for £6000 at the reserve. I was hugely disappointed, but still relieved that it had sold and returned me about £2500 profit, a good result, taking into account the after-effects of the October Exchanges crash.  And more seriously, the Dawson had been a purchase with the profits from two other investments, so essentially it was all profit! Celebrate, cross yourself and say a big thank you amateur investor! 

Making about 75% profit in less than a year was great!  Selling the Penck in New York at the same time and making about £2500 profit or 50% also added to the beauty of dealing in art. Trading paintings of £50-8,000 value was very good business, since the returns were on average 100% and in certain special cases over 1000%.  Did I carry on with that strategy or did I mess up?  The years 1985-1988 were proving to be dream years with insignificant losses, if any at all, to major profits.  Could it get any better? Would it get any better?   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MARINE ART FOR THE SOUL AND THE POCKET!!

INVESTING IN MARINE ART WAS ALWAYS A JOY AND MOSTLY PROFITABLE TOO!!

 

LEON KALOGEROPOULOS

 

THE COLLECTION OF GREEKSINART INCLUDES ABOUT 40 PAINTINGS OF MARINE CONTENT AND IN VARIOUS STYLES INCLUDING IMPRESSIONIST PAINTINGS BY VASILIS ZENETZIS. THE MAIN BODY OF THE COLLECTION IS BY LEON KALOGEROPOULOS, WHOSE TALENT WAS WELL RECOGNISED AT THE MAJOR AUCTION OF LONDON.

 

 

Daredevil acts!

Montague Dawson

(British, [1895-1973] Most famous and most popular British marine artist of the twentieth century. His art is extremely popular on both sides of the Atlantic. Auction price range £6,000- 200,000)

13th August 1987, Bonhams, London - 1st June 1988, Sotheby’s, London

It was summer 1987, but no holidays for the penniless investor and the family. The kids were too young, cash money was scarce, rather non-existent, and so London was to be the holiday place. Why not? Auctions never stop in the summer even though they are rare and far between. Never one to worry about what to do daily, I kept my routine and had my diary marked for the Marine Sale at Bonhams in August. Always hopeful, I kept hoping for the best possible bargain to lift the gloom I had put myself in with purchases I had made earlier in the year.

There were several paintings I liked, but the ones with potential were two watercolours by Montague Dawson, the most popular and most valuable English marine artist of the twentieth century.  The Dawson watercolours looked magnificent - predominantly blue, atmospheric with proud fishing boats riding the waves. Furthermore and most importantly, they were ridiculously low estimated.  At a thousand pounds each, they were bargains as the markets indicated a valuation close to £10,000 pounds.  They were obviously privately entered and so the experts at Bonhams had a good opportunity to whet the appetite of bargain hunters.

Bargain hunters aplenty everywhere and I was one of them, albeit an art lover too.  How else should I describe myself at that stage of the quest to become an art investor/collector?  I was one of those bargain hunters, no shame to admit it. However, the burning question was how many more like myself were out there to bid that summer evening at Bonhams?  Nothing would stop me from bidding to buy at a reasonable price, but would there be a bidding war, one that could definitely knock me out financially and further into trouble?

I picked up Mr T and headed to Bonhams’ evening sale early. The Dawsons were to be auctioned in the first ten lots and it was hateful to me to be late for any sale. Besides, seeing the paintings once again increased my confidence in them and gave my guest a chance to see what English marine art was all about.

Mr T liked the Dawsons, but he knew nothing about prices or about bidding at auction. There were no auctions in Athens at that time, something that he would change single-handedly soon enough.  There was no significant Greek market in London, something that he would again change soon after. On seeing his collection of Greek art later, I estimated it to be worth about five million pounds.  There were over one thousand paintings of the most famous artists in Greece from Gysis to Volanakis, from Maleas and Parthenis to Ghika and Fassianos.  Both his gallery and his house were Aladdin’s Caves. As he mentioned in passing, “you haven’t seen anything yet until you see the warehouse.” There was no Greek artist whose paintings he didn’t possess and in a good number too. To mention but only one detail, he had the best collection of Parthenis’ work ever; something like twenty great canvases and perhaps one hundred drawings.  This man was indeed “The Man” in Greek art!

The two watercolours of Dawson were very attractive, but I liked the second one more. I was anxious and worried, but I didn’t show this to my guests.  Could I buy the Dawsons at the low estimate?  The first lot came and I bid to £1000 nearly buying at that price. Then calamity! A new face on the auction scene of London entered the dance and the bidding became unpleasantly bloody.  Hundred by hundred, step by step, the price climbed to £2500. Disappointed and frustrated, I looked away and dropped out of the bidding war. No use fighting a losing battle!

Underbidder! How many times did that happen to me? The bitter taste lasts for long and at times it never leaves the memory because that painting was always the life changing one.  However, no use bidding to destruction was my philosophy, so I restrained myself!  Live for another day and another painting! They always appear when least expected!  Money is the only problem as it vanishes instantly into thin air!  Bidding wars are always for the sellers and not the buyers anyway.

I stopped, took a deep breath and decided resolutely that I would bid slightly more and buy my preferred second Dawson. The bidding went exactly like the first one. The buyer of the first lot remained quiet until the £1000 mark. Then he started bidding against me, but I suppose because he had bought one painting already he stopped bidding at £2600, thus allowing me to buy the Dawson I found more appealing at £3000 inclusive of commissions. I was not prepared to pay a penny more. I suppose I was lucky he stopped bidding or was I unlucky?

It was a fair price and I estimated I had a margin of 50% profit at worst. That was the minimum I was working towards and if it happened to be more, all the better.  I was relieved, I showed good face to my guests and I also felt I had made a seriously good buy.

 

Skinned! Where and how do I find £3000?

Never buy without having the funds ready!

I broke the rule as early as 1985 and then again in August 1987. I had no ready funds to pay the Dawson.  However, I had thirty days credit of time to pay Bonhams. Even though auctions say that payment is immediately due, buyers have this time to send funds, to wire funds, and that is a whole month.  That was plenty enough time to raise the money, if I did not sell anything to raise that sum by then. Buying without the funds put me under immense pressure but I always came through before in similar situations and I hoped to do the same in the Dawson case!  Always the optimist, aren’t I?  Managing this time round would take a miracle however!  It was summer!  It was slow! It was three thousand pounds - an enormous sum.

When you deal in pictures you ought to know who buys what and where!

I knew about the stock of galleries in London and outside London, galleries in Athens, a few galleries in Paris, New York and Philadelphia. I also knew a few good dealers. It was to my advantage to be aware of their stock and what they were buying and selling. I made it my business to know by visiting these galleries and asking about future exhibitions and paintings in stock. I wish I had done that with the Seago!

Stacy-Marks was a major gallery in Eastbourne, E. Sussex, which I knew sold good quality paintings. They ran a large, luxurious gallery in one of the most affluent areas of South - East England.

 

Deal or No Deal?

Lucien Potronat

(French, [1889-    ] Well known for his magnificent views of the Côte D’Azur in Southern France and mostly collected in England. Auction price range £500-3000)

In June of 1987 I bought a beautiful View of the Côte D’Azur by Lucien Potronat at Phillips Marylebone, London for just £125. It was a painting for the house and my own joy and enjoyment.  It spoke about home, it spoke about my life and it was a bargain.  More importantly, it was provenanced by Stacy-Marks, Eastbourne England, at some time in the past, as the label on the reverse of the painting indicated.

 

I knew that Stacy-Marks were actively buying the artist because I had seen them bidding and buying Potronat works at Lewes in East Sussex. It was no secret! All good traders, should have known that or similar facts about rich galleries.  Could Potronat assist me to raise the funds I needed in a private sale?

 

Twenty days to go! The pressure to pay the Dawson was on and gradually increasing as the days went by. It was three thousand pounds, a very serious sum of money in 1987.  I had no such sum in the bank as everything had been invested in Penck, Roubaud, Girardet, Montezin, Fassianos and other artists, which were to be sold at auction later in the year.

 

I loved the Med View of Lucien Potronat and had intended to keep the painting for the family’s enjoyment and for the future. However, when in need of money, you need to sell what is the easiest and the quickest. If you own stocks you sell your stocks, if you own art you sell your art and selling art privately to a gallery was the quickest way for me.

 

I knew the painting was worth a couple of thousand pounds because smaller size paintings of the artist were selling close to six hundred pounds at auction. Could I sell the Potronat privately to Stacy-Marks? Would they be interested?  How would I make up the missing money even if I sold the painting to that gallery? I would still be short of a few hundred pounds and I had only twenty days to pay Bonhams.

 

Stacy-Marks was one of those family galleries with old stock and shrewd old shoes running the business. My call to them was short and to the point. On mentioning the name Potronat, they immediately asked to see the painting with a view to buying it, if we came to an agreement.  No promises, but that was an encouraging initial contact. I could not mess up this transaction, as I was desperate for the money.  It was tricky, it was the first time I was selling to a gallery, but there is always a first time. 

 

I drove to Eastbourne that Saturday with a million thoughts circling in my mind. Would they buy at the right price? Would they throw me out?  What would happen with the Dawson? Would Bonhams cut me out as their client, if I failed to pay in time?  Keep cool, do not panic and do not show anxiety and worry. Play your cards right and everything will be fine, I kept telling myself.  Much harder to do than say!

 

On entering the impressive gallery in the heart of Eastbourne, a thriving town on the south coast of England, I was struck by the high quality of the art on the walls. I introduced myself and soon enough it was show time.  They liked the painting. They surely did. It was one of theirs. “How much do you want?” inquired the old fox, Stacy-Marks. He was the one calling the shots and there was a bright sparkle in the old man’s eyes. He knew the business much better than his sons and myself. The evidence was there to see.

 

“I am selling the painting for £2000.  It’s a lovely painting and worth every penny.”  Cool and composed, I made my case. No nerves, no worries and very sure of myself. Where did that come from? This was supposed to be a first time!

 

“Yes,” the old man responded, “it is worth that much, but we are dealers and we want to make a little bit of money too. I think a fair deal is £1500.”  I rejected the offer as too little in the hope of making a little more. Back and forth, hesitation here and there and the compromise was £1800 on the spot. They were happy with the purchase - I was delighted with it, to say the least.  A cheque of £1800 was handed to me; signed and rubber-stamped.  It was an immense achievement as a first time!

 

With an £1800 cheque in my pocket, I felt like flying back to London. I was on top of the world!  Four years after I had started dealing in art, I could sell directly to galleries at a good profit.  Do you call a return of 1500% only a good profit!  The trip back to London was like a minute. I was so proud of myself. It was such a satisfying experience and a moneymaking one too.  I was full of beans and convinced that I wouldn’t have a problem paying for the Dawson.  But I was still short of about £1000, still a significant sum. What else could I sell or buy for immediate re-sale? Success whets the appetite and you want more of the same.

 

Luck was on my side all the way! Thank you!

 

Fiction is fine, but the art trading events in these memoirs are better than fiction at times.  Here I am recounting these unbelievable events that occurred at the right time and the right moment. How was that possible?  I still wonder and still ask!  Who and what was moving the pieces and making events happen? Luck? Surely something was intervening on my behalf. I was moving my little finger too, but something else was at play and the Ancient Greek saying is appropriate here,

 

“ Sin Athena kai heira kinei”.  “Move your little finger, if you wish luck to assist you.”

 

TO BE CONTINUED NEXT SUNDAY!!

 

 

 

OOPS AND THE PAINTING FALLS OFF THE WALL!!

I HANGED MANY EXHIBITIONS

 

ANGELOS, AT THE GREEK COFFEE SHOP

 

ART EXHIBITIONS!!

IN MY ART QUEST AND ENDEAVOURS I HAD ORGANISED MANY EXHIBITIONS AND HAD PLENTY TO DO IN ORDER BRING THE SHOWS TO OPENING DAY AND VIEWING OF FIRST DAY. IT IS ALL HARD WORK AND MUCH HELP AND ASSISTANCE IS NEEDED TO HAVE ALL READY IN TIME.

PIMLICO, LONDON WAS THE AREA AND THE GALLERY ONE OF THE BIGGEST IN THE SQUARE TO RENT AND BE IN THE MIDDLE OF AN ANTIQUES AND ART AREA. IT WAS BACK IN 1992 AND THE HANGING OF PAINTINGS WAS GOING SMOOTHLY. I HAD DONE IT BEFORE AND THERE WAS NO DIFFICULTY IN HANGING PAINTINGS IN A GALLERY ORGANISED THAT WELL.

AMONG THE EXHIBITION ITEMS WAS AN ALABASTER STATUE OF A GOOD SWISS ARTIST WHICH I BOUGHT AT SOTHEBYS FOR A SMALL SUM A FEW YEARS EARLIER. CONDUIT STREET OFFERED BARGAINS THEN.

THE STATUE WAS IN ITS EXHIBITION SPOT AND THE PAINTINGS HANGING PERFECTLY ON THE WALLS. SUDDENLY, AND WHILE I WAS AT THE BACK OF THE GALLERY HANGING A FEW MORE PAINTINGS, I HEARD A BIG BANG AND RUSHED INTO THE MAIN GALLERY ROOM TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED. 

WHAT WAS THAT, I WONDERED, BUT SUSPECTED THAT A PAINTING HAD FALLEN OFF THE WALL FOR ONE REASON OR ANOTHER. INDEED, AT THE FRONT OF THE GALLERY WAS A PAINTING, A BIG PAINTING IN A HEAVY FRAME, LYING ON THE FLOOR AND SCATTERED IN FIVE SIX PIECES THE ALABASTER STATUE. I WAS OF COURSE SURPRISED THAT ONE OF THE PAINTINGS CAME DOWN LIKE A THUNDERBOLT TO DESTROY A GOOD PIECE OF ART. FORTUNATELY AND MIRACULOUSLY, THE PAINTING WAS NOT DAMAGED. THAT WAS GOOD FORTUNE, I AM SURE!!

I PICKED UP THE PIECES TO GET RID OF THEM BUT.....

NO WORRIES, PETER, THE OWNER OF THE GALLERY SAID. THE PAINTINGS ARE INSURED AND YOU WILL GET THE INSURANCE ON THE ITEM AS YOU HAVE IT PRICED IN YOUR CATALOGUE. THAT WAS SOME COMPENSATION FOR HAVING INSURANCE. WITHIN A WEEK I WAS PAID FROM THE GALLERY INSURANCE 1000 POUNDS.

THAT IS THE BENEFITS OF INSURING ALL YOUR ART AND THAT IS WHY I NEVER QUESTION INSURANCE CHARGES AT AUCTIONS, WHENEVER I SELL ANYTHING THESE DAYS. I AM HAPPY TO SAY THAT NO ART OF MINE WAS LOST IN ANY POST OR CURRIER TO THIS DAY. 

I GUESS I AM LUCKY BUT ALSO I DO NOT WORRY PAYING THEIR INSURANCE. PEACE OF MIND IS BETTER THAN HEADACHES OF SERIOUS LOSSES.

PETER CONSTANT